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Dr Michael Stock

Dr Michael Stock

Junior Research Fellow

Igneous petrology, Volcanology, Geochemistry

Department of Earth Sciences
Downing Street
Cambridge

CB2 3EQ
Office Phone: +44 1223 333400

Biography:

I am the Darwin and Galápagos Islands Research Fellow at Christ's College, based in the Department of Earth Sciences. Before moving to Cambridge in 2016 I completed my D.Phil at the University of Oxford.

My research combines aspects of igneous petrology, volcanology, mineralogy and geochemistry. I use the chemistry of erupted igneous rocks to constrain the processes that occur within sub-volcanic magma chambers. In particular, I seek to understand how petrologic records can elucidate controls on the timing and magnitude of volcanic eruptions. By studying past eruptions, my aim is to better understand signals that we monitor at the Earth's surface in active and dormant volcanic systems. I develop analytical techniques for creation of novel geochemical datasets and thermodynamic models to help understand ermpirical observations.

I am a member of the Cambridge Volcanology Group and the Apatite Volatiles Research Group.

Magmatic processes in Galápagos

I am currently investigating the petrology and geochemistry of erupted volcanic rocks on the Galápagos Islands. Using state-of-the-art analytical techniques, I hope to unravel the petrologic record of pre-eruptive magmatic processes in the archipelago, identifying eruption triggers and controls on the style of volcanic activity. Additionally, the islands provide a unique natural laboratory that I hope to utilise to investigate the fundamental link between volcanic processes at the Earth’s surface and the mechanisms of magma generation in the mantle. Galápagos is one of the world’s most volcanically active regions and eruptions pose a significant threat to the islands’ ecology and human population. Ultimately, my work will aid in hazard assessment, and will feed into civil and wildlife protection efforts.

The hydrous mineral volatile record

I am interested in using analysis of hydrous minerals and volcanic glass to determine the pre-eruptive behaviour and concentrations of volatile species in volcanic systems. My work has been focused on the mineral apatite and how this can be used to asses changes in magmatic volatile contents through time, in the build-up to eruptions. I recently applied this method to the Campi Flegrei volcano in Naples, Italy, to investigate potential eruption triggers.

For information regarding our recent publication ‘Late-stage volatile saturation as a potential trigger for explosive volcanic eruptions’ in Nature Geoscience, please read:

Prof. David Pyle’s article for The Conversation

Coverage by the BBC

IFL Science article

 

Keywords

Petrology ; Volcanology ; Geochemistry

Topics

  • Magma mixing and ascent
  • Volcanology
  • Volatile geochemical cycling
  • Igneous petrology

Key Publications

Stock, M.J., Humphreys, M.C.S., Smith, V.C., Isaia, R., and Pyle, D.M., 2016, ‘Late-stage volatile saturation as a potential trigger for explosive volcanic eruptions’, Nature Geoscience, doi: 10.1038/NGEO2639

Scott, J.A.J., Humphreys, M.C.S., Mather, T.A., Pyle, D.M., and Stock, M.J., 2015, ‘Insights into the behaviour of S, F and Cl at Santiguito Volcano, Guatemala, from apatite and glass’, Lithos, 232, 375-394

Stock, M.J., Humphreys, M.C.S., Smith, V.C., Johnson, R.D., Pyle, D.M., and EIMF, 2015, ‘New constraints on electron-beam induced halogen migration in apatite’, American Mineralogist, 100, 281-293

James, R.H., Green, D.R.H., Stock, M.J., Alker, B.J., Banerjee, N.R., Cole, C., German, C.R., Al Huvenna, V., Powell, A.M., and Connelly, D.P., 2014, ‘Composition of hydrothermal fluids and mineralogy of associated chimney material on the East Scotia Ridge back-arc spreading centre’, Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 139, 47-71

Stock, M.J., Taylor, R.N., and Gernon, T.M., 2012, ‘Triggering of major eruptions recorded by actively forming cumulates’, Scientific Reports, 2, 731, doi: 10.1038/srep00731