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Geochemistry Details

Isotope Geochemistry Laboratories

Academic Staff Member

Prof. M. J. Bickle / Dr. A Galy / Dr A. Piotrowski

Contact

Dr Hazel Chapman tel: 33405

Location

S. Wing, Ground Floor: Room S19/21 tel: 33445
S. Wing, 4th Floor : Rooms S405 – 410 tel: 33445  and S417 tel:33404

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NU Instruments ICP-MS
The laboratories are exceptionally well equipped for the isotopic analysis of Ca, Mg, Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, Pa, Pb, Th, U, and many other elements at extremely low levels from rock, mineral and water samples. This type of analytical work requires enormous attention to detail in order to achieve low blanks and precise results. A high level of manual dexterity is a positive advantage.

 

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VG Sector 54 TIMS

Isotope analyses and geochemical projects within the laboratories are authorised by Prof. Mike Bickle, who will liaise with Dr Albert Galy and Dr Alex Piotrowski. Use of the laboratories under supervision is available to those who have well-formulated research projects consistent with the isotope geochemistry laboratories' capabilities. Sampling is critical to any isotopic geochemical project, so it is essential to plan any project well in advance.

There are many opportunities, and indeed encouragement is given, for involvement in technical developments of micro-chemical methods and mass-spectrometer maintenance. Training takes place through close interaction with other researchers so a minimum of 3-6 months is usually necessary to undertake a project and obtain a useful level of proficiency. As chemical separations use strong acids, all safety protocols must be followed. See Hazel for assistance following ‘use of laboratory' process and any necessary chemical hazard risk assessments.

 


Ocean Geochemistry and Palaeoceanography Laboratories

Academic Staff Member

Professor H. Elderfield

Senior Research Associate

Dr Mervyn Greaves

Location

S. Wing, 4th Floor
Rooms 416-418

Tel.: 33403

Equipment

Varian Vista Axial ICP-AES

Finnigan Element XR 

Sample preparation lab

As part of the Godwin Laboratory for Palaeoclimate Research, the laboratories are exceptionally well-equipped for trace metal ratio determinations in foraminifera and other marine samples. This type of analytical work requires enormous attention to detail in order to achieve good results, and a high level of manual dexterity is a positive advantage.

Use of the laboratories is authorised by Professor Harry Elderfield and they available to those who have well-formulated research projects consistent with the laboratories' analytical capabilities. Success in this analytical area requires a high level of skill and dedication and, because routine assistance is not available and training takes place through close interaction with other researchers, a minimum of 6 to 12 months is usually necessary to undertake a sensible project and obtain a useful level of competence.

The procedures used involve toxic and hazardous materials, and therefore close assistance and supervision is necessary at some stages in the preparative techniques.

All users must sign a Use of Laboratories form. A risk assessment is required covering all the chemicals used and processes performed.

 


 

Geochronology and Terrestrial Geochemistry Laboratories

Academic Staff Member

Professor M.J. Bickle

Contact

Dr Jason Day

Location

S. Wing – 4th Floor - Room 415 
Tel: 33468

Equipment

This lab contains fume cupboards, an oven, analytical balance, furnace, desicators, hotplates, DI water system, glassware, various sample preparation devices and tools that may be lent out for short term use on their projects. This laboratory provides facilities for standard chemical procedures. Use of the laboratory is authorised by Professor Mike Bickle who must be consulted in advance of any use of the laboratory. 

All users of Chemistry facilities must sign a Use of Laboratories form and a risk assessment that includes all the chemicals to be used in the process performed. Many chemicals are toxic or hazardous and advice on potential dangers and recommended operating procedures must be sought before work is commenced. HF is often used in this lab so users must know about the risks involved, even if they are not using it themselves.

The laboratory must be left clean and tidy as it is often busy.

Information on Carbonate Staining with Alizarin red S and potassium ferricyanide 

 


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