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Brachiopods prove tougher than previously thought

last modified Apr 18, 2018 09:08 AM
A remarkable 120-year record of resilience to environmental change in the world’s oceans has been uncovered within a group of marine organisms called brachiopods. Although they are not well known today, brachiopods have had considerable importance in the evolution of seabed life.
Brachiopods prove tougher than previously thought

In the pink – thriving clusters of brachiopods anchored to intertidal rocks amongst mussels, serpulids and chitons in Paterson Inlet, Stewart Island, New Zealand ©Elizabeth M Harper

It has been predicted that brachiopods might be especially vulnerable to environmental change. But Emma Cross and Liz Harper from Cambridge Earth Sciences and other Cambridge colleagues from the British Antarctic Survey have found that a species of brachiopod, called Calloria inconspicua, has successfully combatted a significant level of warming and acidification in ocean waters over the last century and more. 

Read more

A 120-year record of resilience to environmental change in brachiopods, Emma L Cross, Elizabeth M Harper & Lloyd S Peck is published in Global Change Biology.

 

Earth Sciences at Cambridge

Booking for the Cambridge Open Days on Thursday 5 and Friday 6 July 2018 is now open

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Saturday 22 September 2018: A one-day conference bringing together international scientists to mark 200 years since Adam Sedgwick was appointed to the Woodwardian Chair of Geology.

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