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Engaging with Science Policy

Engaging with Science Policy

Victoria Honour, 2nd year PhD student, writes about her experiences as a Science Policy Intern at the House of Commons.

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Earth Sciences win second place in the Workplace Travel Challenge

Earth Sciences win second place in the Workplace Travel Challenge

A team of nine people from Earth Sciences, took part in the Workplace Travel Challenge at the end of April 2017.

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Jo Clegg wins competition with the most sustainable recipe

Jo Clegg wins competition with the most sustainable recipe

Earth Sciences' Jo Clegg wins a competition on sustainable food with the most sustainable recipe

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Cambridge Earth Sciences top in the Complete University Guide

Cambridge Earth Sciences top in the Complete University Guide

The Department of Earth Sciences is once again top amongst UK geology departments in the latest tables.

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The man who split the dinosaurs in two – Harry Govier Seeley

The man who split the dinosaurs in two – Harry Govier Seeley

The talk was titled ‘On the Classification of the Fossil Animals Commonly Named Dinosaurs’ and it was given in 1887 by Harry Govier Seeley, Professor of Geology at King’s College, London. Seeley argued that the ‘terrible lizards’, which were becoming increasingly popular at the time, could be simply divided into two great groups – the Saurischia and the Ornithischia based on differences in their hip structure.

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When did making mountains the modern way begin?

When did making mountains the modern way begin?

What with ‘tectonic shifts’ and ‘tectonic proportions’, the processes and terminology of Earth’s major structural change or tectonism have invaded everyday language. Now geological research is adding a new dimension – ‘changing tectonic regimes’, the US presidency comes to mind. So what is a ‘change in tectonic regime’?

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Simple rule predicts when an ice age ends

Simple rule predicts when an ice age ends

A simple rule can accurately predict when Earth’s climate warms out of an ice age, according to a new study published in Nature. Researchers from UCL, University of Cambridge and University of Louvain have combined existing ideas to solve the problem of which solar energy peaks in the last 2.6 million years led to the melting of the ice sheets and the start of a warm period.

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Fossil corset-animals (loriciferans) help solve Darwin’s dilemma

Fossil corset-animals (loriciferans) help solve Darwin’s dilemma

The living corset-animals (loriciferans) are a remarkable group of miniscule, seabed dwelling creatures, which were first found in the 1980s. Now, the discovery by palaeontologists Tom Harvey and Nick Butterfield of the loriciferans’ deep ancestry in 490 million year old Cambrian strata is helping to rewrite the story of the Cambrian explosion of life and resolve what is known as Darwin’s dilemma.

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Tools of the Trade

Tools of the Trade

A display showcasing a selection of the Sedgwick Museum’s unique historic collection of geological hammers.

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The bicentenary of a pioneering account of the Geology of Cambridgeshire

The bicentenary of a pioneering account of the Geology of Cambridgeshire

The first account of the geology of Cambridgeshire was published 200 years ago. Written by the Reverend Professor John Hailstone FRS (1759-1847), the ‘Outline of the Geology of Cambridgeshire’ appeared in the third volume of the Transactions of the Geological Society of London.

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Curious Objects at the University Library

Curious Objects at the University Library

Curious Objects – an exhibition of ‘some unusual and unexpected items’ from the University Library’s collection runs from 3 Nov 2016 - 31 March 2017 at the Milstein Exhibition Centre, Cambridge University Library, West Road, Cambridge CB3 9DR. Free entry.

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Graduate Research Opportunities

Graduate Research Opportunities

A full list of PhD topics for students hoping to start PhDs in 2017 with the Cambridge NERC DTP - Earth Sciences are now online.

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International team head to Papua New Guinea to measure volcanic carbon degassing

International team head to Papua New Guinea to measure volcanic carbon degassing

An international team of scientists is traveling to the islands of Papua New Guinea this September to study degassing from active volcanoes in remote jungles there. Some of these volcanoes are among the most active on Earth, ejecting a significant proportion of global volcanic gases into the atmosphere.

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Mistaken Point - Canada's 10th geological World Heritage Site

Mistaken Point - Canada's 10th geological World Heritage Site

The ancient rugged coastline of Mistaken Point on Newfoundland’s Avalon Peninsula face the winds and waves of the Atlantic Ocean. It can be a difficult place to work, but nevertheless it has been a mecca for geologists for over several decades now.

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An underestimated Kevan

An underestimated Kevan

Douglas Palmer on the Sedgwick Museum’s giant Pliosaurus cf. kevani in the latest edition of Geoscientist

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Oesia – a new tube worm from deep Cambrian times

Oesia – a new tube worm from deep Cambrian times

Collections up close, Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences. The discovery of new fossils of an ancient seabed dwelling hemichordate called Oesia, reveals clues about their deep ancestry which is shared with humans.

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Professor Harry Elderfield tribute

Professor Harry Elderfield tribute

It was with great sadness that we announced the death of Harry Elderfield, on Tuesday 19 April 2016.

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Virtual Scilla Collection project

Virtual Scilla Collection project

One of the questions most frequently asked by visitors to the Sedgwick Museum is what exactly are fossils and how do they form?

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Fingerprinting rare earth elements from the air

Fingerprinting rare earth elements from the air

Over the past year, Earth Sciences’ Dr Sally Gibson has been working together with Dr Teal Riley and Dr David Neave through a University of Cambridge-BAS Joint Innovation Panel on a remote sensing technique that could aid the identification of ‘rare earth elements’ (REEs) in rocks anywhere in the world.

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Explosive Earth: Earthquakes and Eruptions in Iceland

The Cambridge Volcano Seismology group will be showcasing their latest work on the Bárðarbunga-Holuhraun dyke intrusion and fissure eruption at the Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition 4th-10th July 2016.

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Athena SWAN Bronze award

Athena SWAN Bronze award

We are very pleased to announce that the Department has been awarded its first Athena SWAN Bronze award.

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Bob Carter 1942-2016

Bob Carter 1942-2016

Professor Robert Merlin Carter (known as Bob) died in January this year. Bob studied for his PhD in the Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge from 1964-1968.

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Geophysical Research Letters, Volume 43, Issue 4

Geophysical Research Letters, Volume 43, Issue 4

The cover of the current issue of Geophysical Research Letters, An AGU Journal, features a painting by Brandur Bjarnason Karlson showing the main eruption crater Baugur.

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Shackleton's geologist - James Mann Wordie (1889-1962)

A hundred years ago, on August 30th, 1916, James Mann Wordie was one of the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition team rescued from Elephant Island, off the coast of Antarctica, following the sinking of their ship Endurance. Wordie was Shackleton’s geologist and a graduate of St John’s College (1912) who became its Master forty years later.

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Geological Mapping: Stripping the Land Bare

An exhibition in the Sedgwick Museum to celebrate the bicentenary of the publication of William Smith’s 1815 geological map

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August edition of Nature Geoscience

August edition of Nature Geoscience

This month’s Nature Geoscience features an article and an image on the cover by Professor Bob White. The image shows the Holuhraun fissure eruption in Iceland on 2 September 2014.

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Earthquakes Without Frontiers

Earthquakes Without Frontiers

Professor James Jackson returned from Kathmandu, having attended an Earthquakes Without Frontiers (EwF) Partnership meeting, in the week preceding the Gorkha (Nepal) earthquake on the 25 April.

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Indian High Commissioner's visit

Indian High Commissioner's visit

His Excellency Mr Ranjan Mathai, Indian High Commissioner, visited the department following an invitation extended by Dr Alan Smith. His Excellency was accompanied by Dr Shailesh Kumar Singh.

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Earth Sciences at Cambridge

Booking for the Cambridge Open Days on Thursday 5 and Friday 6 July 2018 is now open

Further information

Saturday 22 September 2018: A one-day conference bringing together international scientists to mark 200 years since Adam Sedgwick was appointed to the Woodwardian Chair of Geology.

Further information