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Department of Earth Sciences

 
Read more at: Prof. Sasha Turchyn is 2022 AGU Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology Willi Dansgaard Award recipient
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Prof. Sasha Turchyn is 2022 AGU Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology Willi Dansgaard Award recipient

7 September 2022

Professor Sasha Turcyhn was announced as American Geophysical Union’s (AGU) 2022 Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology Willi Dansgaard Award recipient. Being selected as a Section Honoree is bestowed upon individuals for meritorious work or service toward the advancement and promotion of discovery and solution science. AGU...


Read more at: Land plants changed Earth’s composition, say scientists
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Land plants changed Earth’s composition, say scientists

31 August 2022

A new study, involving scientists from the University of Cambridge, has found that the evolution of land plants caused a sudden shift in the composition of Earth’s continents. The research, which is published in the journal Nature Geoscience , investigated the effects of land plant evolution on Earth’s chemical composition...


Read more at: Department holds first Sutton Trust Summer School
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Department holds first Sutton Trust Summer School

16 August 2022

The Department of Earth Sciences hosted its first Sutton Trust Summer School on the 16 th August. Year 12 students from across the country had the chance to experience studying the subject at Cambridge through an immersive week-long programme. The Sutton Trust is an educational charity which aims to improve social mobility...


Read more at: Climate and conflict: new research from the Godwin Lab

Climate and conflict: new research from the Godwin Lab

10 August 2022


Read more at: Million-year old mystery of ice age intensity linked to carbon storage in the deep-sea
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Million-year old mystery of ice age intensity linked to carbon storage in the deep-sea

5 August 2022

Close to a million years ago our planet’s climate changed, as the intensity of the great ice ages increased. Now scientists at the University of Cambridge have found that this climatic shift was associated with a decrease in oxygen and an increase in carbon storage in the deep ocean, causing carbon dioxide in the...


Read more at: Cambridge Volcano Seismologists begin fieldwork in Iceland

Cambridge Volcano Seismologists begin fieldwork in Iceland

4 August 2022

Volcanic activity has started up again on Iceland’s Reykjanes Peninsula -- less than a year after lava stopped spewing from what was thought to be a relatively quiet corner of the island. A group of volcano seismologists from our Department are heading out to Iceland this weekend, beginning three weeks of fieldwork spread...


Read more at: Century-long sea snail study identifies surprising impacts of climate change on coastal ecosystems
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Century-long sea snail study identifies surprising impacts of climate change on coastal ecosystems

18 July 2022

Climate change is threatening marine species and ecosystems with rising temperatures and extreme weather. Now scientists from Cambridge and the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Science have observed how sea snails living on rocky shores are coping with climate change, through studying 130 years of data from dog whelk...


Read more at: Lavas from Galápagos reveal contents of superstructures deep beneath Earth’s surface
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Lavas from Galápagos reveal contents of superstructures deep beneath Earth’s surface

13 July 2022

Plumes of hot rock rising from nearly three thousand kilometres beneath our feet contain clues as to the contents of mysterious superstructures lying atop the Earth’s core, show new findings presented today at the Goldschmidt conference . Many of the most violent outpourings of volcanic activity in history tapped into a...


Read more at: Megalodon sat higher up the food chain than any marine predator in history, says new tooth analysis
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Megalodon sat higher up the food chain than any marine predator in history, says new tooth analysis

23 June 2022

New research involving the University of Cambridge shows that prehistoric megatooth sharks — the biggest sharks that ever lived — were the ultimate top predators, operating higher up the food chain than any other marine predators through history. The study, published in Science Advances , shows that Megalodon — the largest...


Read more at: No signs (yet) of life on Venus
Synthesized false colour image of Venus, Credit: JAXA / ISAS / Akatsuki Project Team

No signs (yet) of life on Venus

14 June 2022

The unusual behaviour of sulphur in Venus’ atmosphere cannot be explained by an ‘aerial’ form of extra-terrestrial life, according to a new study. Research from the University of Cambridge used a combination of biochemistry and atmospheric chemistry to test the ‘life in the clouds’ hypothesis, which astronomers have...