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Acting Director of the Sedgwick Museum appointed

Acting Director of the Sedgwick Museum appointed

Dr Elizabeth Harper has been appointed Acting Director of the Sedgwick Museum following the retirement of Dr Ken McNamara.

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100 years since John E Marr elected Woodwardian Professor

100 years since John E Marr elected Woodwardian Professor

To mark 100 years since John E Marr became Woodwardian Professor, on 30 October 1917, a selection of documents have been digitised and will be available to view on the Sedgwick Museum website from 30 October.

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Plate Tectonics at 50

Plate Tectonics at 50

The Geological Society of London has launched its new archive of Emeritus Professor Dan McKenzie’s work.

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Christine Kelsey (1931-2017)

Christine Kelsey (1931-2017)

We are very sad to announce the death of Christine Kelsey on Wednesday 23 August.

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Alan Smith (1937-2017)

Alan Smith (1937-2017)

We are very sad to announce the death of Alan Smith on Sunday 13th August.

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Volcanic arcs recycle crustal carbon

Volcanic arcs recycle crustal carbon

New research by Cambridge scientists is helping answer a key question about the origin of carbon emitted from Earth’s volcanoes.

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Global cooling from a less leaky Ice Age Ocean

Global cooling from a less leaky Ice Age Ocean

A new survey and analysis of global radiocarbon dates derived from ocean-dwelling micro-organisms is providing important new measures of the difference between the ocean today and 20,000 years ago, at the height of the last Ice Age.

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Shape-shifting rangeomorphs cut fractal frills to grow and grow

Shape-shifting rangeomorphs cut fractal frills to grow and grow

Around 571 million years ago life first made a grade-change from organisms that were only a few centimetres in size to those that grew to two metres or so high. The organisms that were able to take off in this way were the extinct rangeomorphs, softbodied frondose organisms that grew rooted in the seabed of late Precambrian times.

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Don’s Diary

Don’s Diary

This article first appeared in CAM - the Cambridge Alumni Magazine – Issue 81 Easter 2017. Professor Marian Holness is Professor of Petrology and a Fellow of Trinity College.

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‘Plumerang’ health risk

‘Plumerang’ health risk

Scientists have discovered that significant changes can occur in the composition of volcanic eruptive plumes whilst circulating high above the atmosphere. Nicknamed ‘plumerangs’, the evolution of such plumes represent a previously unappreciated health hazard.

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Engaging with Science Policy

Engaging with Science Policy

Victoria Honour, 2nd year PhD student, writes about her experiences as a Science Policy Intern at the House of Commons.

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Earth Sciences win second place in the Workplace Travel Challenge

Earth Sciences win second place in the Workplace Travel Challenge

A team of nine people from Earth Sciences, took part in the Workplace Travel Challenge at the end of April 2017.

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Jo Clegg wins competition with the most sustainable recipe

Jo Clegg wins competition with the most sustainable recipe

Earth Sciences' Jo Clegg wins a competition on sustainable food with the most sustainable recipe

Jo Clegg wins competition with the most sustainable recipe - Read More…

Cambridge Earth Sciences top in the Complete University Guide

Cambridge Earth Sciences top in the Complete University Guide

The Department of Earth Sciences is once again top amongst UK geology departments in the latest tables.

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The man who split the dinosaurs in two – Harry Govier Seeley

The man who split the dinosaurs in two – Harry Govier Seeley

The talk was titled ‘On the Classification of the Fossil Animals Commonly Named Dinosaurs’ and it was given in 1887 by Harry Govier Seeley, Professor of Geology at King’s College, London. Seeley argued that the ‘terrible lizards’, which were becoming increasingly popular at the time, could be simply divided into two great groups – the Saurischia and the Ornithischia based on differences in their hip structure.

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When did making mountains the modern way begin?

When did making mountains the modern way begin?

What with ‘tectonic shifts’ and ‘tectonic proportions’, the processes and terminology of Earth’s major structural change or tectonism have invaded everyday language. Now geological research is adding a new dimension – ‘changing tectonic regimes’, the US presidency comes to mind. So what is a ‘change in tectonic regime’?

When did making mountains the modern way begin? - Read More…

Simple rule predicts when an ice age ends

Simple rule predicts when an ice age ends

A simple rule can accurately predict when Earth’s climate warms out of an ice age, according to a new study published in Nature. Researchers from UCL, University of Cambridge and University of Louvain have combined existing ideas to solve the problem of which solar energy peaks in the last 2.6 million years led to the melting of the ice sheets and the start of a warm period.

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Fossil corset-animals (loriciferans) help solve Darwin’s dilemma

Fossil corset-animals (loriciferans) help solve Darwin’s dilemma

The living corset-animals (loriciferans) are a remarkable group of miniscule, seabed dwelling creatures, which were first found in the 1980s. Now, the discovery by palaeontologists Tom Harvey and Nick Butterfield of the loriciferans’ deep ancestry in 490 million year old Cambrian strata is helping to rewrite the story of the Cambrian explosion of life and resolve what is known as Darwin’s dilemma.

Fossil corset-animals (loriciferans) help solve Darwin’s dilemma - Read More…

Tools of the Trade

Tools of the Trade

A display showcasing a selection of the Sedgwick Museum’s unique historic collection of geological hammers.

Tools of the Trade - Read More…

The bicentenary of a pioneering account of the Geology of Cambridgeshire

The bicentenary of a pioneering account of the Geology of Cambridgeshire

The first account of the geology of Cambridgeshire was published 200 years ago. Written by the Reverend Professor John Hailstone FRS (1759-1847), the ‘Outline of the Geology of Cambridgeshire’ appeared in the third volume of the Transactions of the Geological Society of London.

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Curious Objects at the University Library

Curious Objects at the University Library

Curious Objects – an exhibition of ‘some unusual and unexpected items’ from the University Library’s collection runs from 3 Nov 2016 - 31 March 2017 at the Milstein Exhibition Centre, Cambridge University Library, West Road, Cambridge CB3 9DR. Free entry.

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Graduate Research Opportunities

Graduate Research Opportunities

A full list of PhD topics for students hoping to start PhDs in 2017 with the Cambridge NERC DTP - Earth Sciences are now online.

Graduate Research Opportunities - Read More…

International team head to Papua New Guinea to measure volcanic carbon degassing

International team head to Papua New Guinea to measure volcanic carbon degassing

An international team of scientists is traveling to the islands of Papua New Guinea this September to study degassing from active volcanoes in remote jungles there. Some of these volcanoes are among the most active on Earth, ejecting a significant proportion of global volcanic gases into the atmosphere.

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Mistaken Point - Canada's 10th geological World Heritage Site

Mistaken Point - Canada's 10th geological World Heritage Site

The ancient rugged coastline of Mistaken Point on Newfoundland’s Avalon Peninsula face the winds and waves of the Atlantic Ocean. It can be a difficult place to work, but nevertheless it has been a mecca for geologists for over several decades now.

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An underestimated Kevan

An underestimated Kevan

Douglas Palmer on the Sedgwick Museum’s giant Pliosaurus cf. kevani in the latest edition of Geoscientist

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Oesia – a new tube worm from deep Cambrian times

Oesia – a new tube worm from deep Cambrian times

Collections up close, Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences. The discovery of new fossils of an ancient seabed dwelling hemichordate called Oesia, reveals clues about their deep ancestry which is shared with humans.

Oesia – a new tube worm from deep Cambrian times - Read More…

Professor Harry Elderfield tribute

Professor Harry Elderfield tribute

It was with great sadness that we announced the death of Harry Elderfield, on Tuesday 19 April 2016.

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Virtual Scilla Collection project

Virtual Scilla Collection project

One of the questions most frequently asked by visitors to the Sedgwick Museum is what exactly are fossils and how do they form?

Virtual Scilla Collection project - Read More…